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past that meander up and down the park under pines and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prep
are not used to this unmediated environment. as long as you drink water, you are probably going to be ok. there is not a lot of criminal activity. everyone is really over provided for. to meet the survival challenge, they oversupplied. superfluous goods that people end up giving away to one another. there is really not a lot of crime. there is too much to do. [laughter] >> could you talk more about that factor, that there is an abundance of good, which is interesting, being in the desert. the economic system that is up there. we talked a long time ago for a "for a magazine" story. one of the things that you said is that commerce, in an of itself, is not the enemy. it is the backbone of civilization. >> to be against commerce is to be against your clothing. who would be against commerce? we just said we are living in a world that has been overly come modified. where everything has been turned into a commodity value. people do not have the identities. we are world full of brands and no identity. you can read your entire life -- you can do your business and go about in the world using your
, biology, physics, listening, cognitive, perception and social behavior and the environment. right here in san francisco. and it just does not happen in every city, but it will happen here. not only in san francisco, but for the families around the world. and the exporatorium does so much more for our san francisco communities. it offers our region's children and families 3,500 under served children and families will have free, science workshops. 70. yes. 70 under served middle high school students, opportunities to participate in college prep courses right here and training and hiring of over 200 of our city's youth, in docet jobs called explainers who will be warmly greeting you in front of the brand new station of the exporatorium of muni. [ applause ] >> so that is the function and the purpose of the exporatorium and let me tell you a little bit about how this place does even more than that. it provides public new access, public access to water-front sites for the first time in over 50 years. two, brand new acres of public accessible open space. access to our historic bulkhead at pi
, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willin
-d environment and it gives them the flexibility of having convenience. it addresses transportation difficulties from mainstream outpatient treatment and it gives them the opportunity to access resources for their recovery process anytime that they choose. our virtual world program is for the adolescent, age ranges from 18 to 28. and it's online, virtual world counseling, so you can do individual sessions as well as group sessions at your accessibility. so anytime that you are available to do sessions, it's kind of at your fingertips. our premise has not ever been that virtual treatment would be better than traditional treatment. it has always been to be able to provide treatment to those people that have bahriers to getting traditional treatment. there's many clients that are unable to access traditional treatment, especially if they live in rural areas. maybe they live 40 or 60 miles away from the nearest treatment facility. maybe they have lost their license because of a dwi charge or maybe they don't have a vehicle or can't afford a vehicle, can't afford gas money. so we found a
environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
in schools. it demonstrates the fact that even in a secular environment, the spiritual is often present. in 1787 at the continental could congress -- at the continental congress, the group reached an impasse when benjamin franklin spoke. and he said "gentlemen, i am an old man. but i have lived long enough to know that if a sparrow cannot fall without god knowing it, that an empire or a republican-- a republic cannot rise without his help." and franklin suggested that the group should pray. i think it is an example of bringing the spiritual into a secular environment. many of us feel that the work of the spiritual is that of the minister. and if i were only an ordained clergy person, i could certainly inject some spirituality into my workplace, my work environment. but it's more of a secular environment. i would challenge that presupposition. i think it is critically important to remember that 90% of the life of jesus was spent in a secular occupation. he was a carpenter. only three years in what we would consider the priest, prophet ministry and outreach. 75% of our biblical heroes and
and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to take a view of the city will not forget. it h
valuations on equities based on long term valuations and finally in the type of environment that we're in, there is no powerful investment alternatives to stocks. bond provide low yields. gold doesn't compete. so you might as well own share of growing profits to get a total return in this type of environment. all of those conditions remain in place. >> do you believe we're in the middle of a long term secular market or in the early begins of one? >> we have been in one for sometime and the answer to that question depends on the news going forward. the risks that we have to watch are that there is tremendous speculation that has crept into the u.s. credit markets because of the fed's easy money policy there, chasing people to take risks that may or may not end up being prudent. the same thing is going on in europe. and also, the geo political situation in the middle east poses risks. so what i would say is that if none of the triggers are pulled, a credit event in the united states or europe. we will end up with stocks ultimately beingover valued and that would be the end of the bull marke
the standard for exceptional livable urban environments. i don't know if standing here today is hard to conceive that san francisco is the urban environment here on the west coast. one reason it's hard to conceive how dense it is is because san francisco is ahead of the curve of making it a transit system. we have a simple subway to follow. san francisco is going to continue to lead the way forward both on transportation and on sustainable urban environments. without question we are going to see these forward looking transit projects continue to propel the economics projects of the city and it's live ability and vitality. what we are seeing here at 350 mission, that represents an important milestone in the fulfillment of that transit center vision. as most of you know, kilroy has been the most active investor in san francisco these days and bay area over the last few years and we've done so because we believe in this city and we've also done so because we have immense confidence in mayor lee. it's no coincidence that under mayor lee and his administration that we've seen such technol
and the environment. right here in san francisco. and it just does not happen in every city, but it will happen here. not only in san francisco, but for the families around the world. and the exporatorium does so much more for our san francisco communities. it offers our region's children and families 3,500 under served children and families will have free, science workshops. 70. yes. 70 under served middle high school students, opportunities to participate in college prep courses right here and training and hiring of over 200 of our city's youth, in docet jobs called explainers who will be warmly greeting you in front of the brand new station of the exporatorium of muni. [ applause ] >> so that is the function and the purpose of the exporatorium and let me tell you a little bit about how this place does even more than that. it provides public new access, public access to water-front sites for the first time in over 50 years. two, brand new acres of public accessible open space. access to our historic bulkhead at pier 15 and the bay history walk. links to the urban and marine environment with two ne
10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like listening. really listening to watch what is going to emerge.
again setting the standard for exceptional livable urban environments. i don't know if standing here today is hard to conceive that san francisco is the urban environment here on the west coast. one reason it's hard to conceive how dense it is is because san francisco is ahead of the curve of making it a transit system. we have a simple subway to follow. san francisco is going to continue to lead the way forward both on transportation and on sustainable urban environments. without question we are going to see these forward looking transit projects continue to propel the economics projects of the city and it's live ability and vitality. what we are seeing here at 350 mission, that represents an important milestone in the fulfillment of that transit center vision. as most of you know, kilroy has been the most active investor in san francisco these days and bay area over the last few years and we've done so because we believe in this city and we've also done so because we have immense confidence in mayor lee. it's no coincidence that under mayor lee and his administration that we've see
the environment. we've taken particular notice of the youth advocates who have registered their support of officer safety as well their omission to rearming probation officers. i want to thank supervisor campos at the outset of his presentation and remarks making mention of the process the department has made in terms of evidence based practices and the focus of our work. >> but we do need to make a presentation that follows defense attorneys the requests that's made at the agenda that's old in the agenda that we're going to focus on the core peace officer responsibilities by holding the highest risk chronic reresidency offenders while released into the communities court jurisdiction. i'm happy to introduce my colleague to share a presentation. chief. >> thank you very much for the introduction. i have a fairly comprehensive power point prevention i'd like to make. good afternoon supervisors and a members of the public and those viewing at home. i'm the assistant chief officer of the department and i intended to share with you our department prevention regarding the changing landscape of the juv
because we don't believe in that. we mean that every classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultural background and we don't couple that with behaviors that kids will display. and the other thing in terms of context that i want to make sure is clear and i didn't am happy you're here and we are fighting a battle against pop culture and the messages they receive on tv, logging on to the facebook page, logging on to all of the social media that is out there, think how many times in pop culture they refer to someone as "their little b, or little n" and that's just the way we greet each other and for someone that entered school only speaking spanish and you think about the language issues and in spanish i can tell you a whole bunch of terms that people use to great each other that are so racist, homo phobic and have a length and accepted as accepted and we need to work together and we're dealing with a culture we are trying to shift and in san francisco
to represent the needs of a nine-county region and the constrained funding viardthv that ~ environment we're working under, this is one challenge that remains in terms of state of good repair. even though 88% of the revenue that is expected to support maintenance and operations, this is our latest projection of what the shortfall is in san francisco that we've calculated as part of our county wide transportation plan process to the order of 6 plus billion dollars over a 28 year period. that's a challenge that remains. there's others from transit crowding to congestion to all sorts of other things. we'll be looking at county wide transportation plan coming up with what are the next generation of projects and policies that we need to respond to those challenges. just a little bit to transition into -- so, this plan is going to be adopted by july. what happens after that and what is already underway to implement the plan? well, on the one hand, i mentioned these two programs, the freeway performance and transit performance initiative. these are new programs of funds and typically in approxim
under pines and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to take a view of the city w
them cooperate on tackling air pollution. japanese environment minister adopted a joint statement with his south korean counterpart and chinese minister. they met for two days in the south wherein japanese city. their talks focused on how to deal with fine particulate matter, an air pollutant known as pm 2.5. they discussed cooperation including research and pollution monitoring. the countries could take a step forward in tackling air pollution. china's leader says he believes the nations will be able to promote cooperation. discussions among experts will needed to determine how to proceed on environmental issues. they hope their discussions on the environment may lead to greater understanding in other areas. >>> people around the world have picked up their cameras to show the challenge of life in north eastern japan. but two years on, fewer are visiting areas hit by the disaster. one photographer with a strong bond to fukushima keeps looking through his viewfinder to help those in his second home. nhk world has his story. >> reporter: he lost his favorite spot in fukushima to the
considerations are most important to consider in the urban environment? >> if i may for purposes of the prop k analysis, can you explain sort of the process that would be followed whereby if there is a desire to amend the project to be compliant with prop k, if you will, to the extent there is a view that it isn't, where does that happen? how does that work? >> i will ask diego sanchez to answer that question. he is the shadow specialist in our department. >> good afternoon, diego sanchez with planning department staff. we would do an analysis, shadow staff would do an analysis under prop k and realize there is x amount of shadow and find that not only to be significant, but also adverse to the impact and we would ask there to be some sort of sculpting with the building and some other changes and revisions to the project. while significant because is there is an additional of net new shadow on the park, it would not have an adverse impact given the qualitative standards that the governing memos for prop k provides. >> who has the final say as to any substantive changes that h
a number of measures to improve the pedestrian environment in this area in terms of reducing some of the sidewalk clutter, you know? providing some better crosswalks. so activities or actions that the project sponsor could take to improve the overall environment. >> i actually appreciate that. i don't know really if residential cars have less in and out versus commercial or visitors may. i don't know if you want to respond to this, because i want to get to public comment. on the weekend jessie square garage is fairly empty from my understanding of the data. so i think there is a ton of traffic congestion on 3rd street on saturdays and actually on sundays as well. i think just because of the number of visitors that are coming to an area. sometimes there is more traffic because of the tourists who use the major corridors whereas residents know different streets and routes. one other qualitative assessment, do you look at the demographics of residents when you think of pedestrian safety impacts? >> we look at the mode split conclusions are based on the census track. in some cases
here because of the sunshine, the clean air, safety in the streets, and the environment. as a developer myself, i know that barely three years ago, the city encouraged low-rises, buildings with a bit of class and character. now all of a sudden three years later, the pendulum has swung completely around. and in its effort to promote height and density, the city is actively encouraging skyscrapers, glass buildings, common in cities like shanghai, et cetera. with little concern for air quality and shadowing. do you want to turn this city into another manhattan, shanghai or hong kong? thank you. >> thanks. next speaker. >> greetings, president chiu, members of the board of supervisors, my name is paul sedway and i live at 765 market street. i have served on the boards of heritage, contemporary museum and spur. i also led what at one point was the largest urban planning consulting firm in the united states, including over 100 environmental impact reports. our firm always tried to prepare eirs that were helpful as an evaluation tool, focusing on two things, alternatives and cumulative effec
of the project. relative to the environment, both as it exists and in the cumulative condition. >> so i think this comes back then to kind of my overall concern of how where we do environmental impact review, particularly for a neighborhood as dense as this is and expected to absorb even more population growth and density. so there the way that you have articulated that, kind of brings back miss brandt-hawley's analogy, which is that you can just have a glass of water and pour a little bit in at a time and it will never be considered significant because of the increment and it came up last summer with the at&t light box question and at what number do we hit and say it's significant; right? and clearly there was an answer to that. with each individual project we tend to do eirs for each individual development project and at what point do we say it's significant, where the project spills over? so i guess my broader question is at what point do we say that we are really impacting a neighborhood and not thinking about the mitigations for it? >>well, i will start by answering how we make that d
here in the city. we protect public health and safety and environment because we are discharging into the bay and into the ocean. this is essentially the first treatment here at our waste water treatment facility. what we do is slow down the water so that things either settle to the bottom or float to the top. you see we have a nice selection of things floating around there, things from bubble gum wrappers, toilet paper, whatever you dump down the toilet, whatever gets into our storm drains, that's what gets into our waste water treatment and we have to clean. >> see these chains here, this keeps scum from building up. >> on this end in the liquid end basically we're just trying to produce a good water product that doesn't negatively impact the receiving water so that we have recreation and no bad impact on fish and aquatic life. solids is what's happening. . >> by sludge, what exactly do you mean? is that the actual technical term? . >> it's a technical term and it's used in a lot of different ways, but this is organic sewage sludge. basically what it is is, oh, maybe things tha
and cell phones. >> protect the environment and your local community. to sell a device, you have to be 18 years of age. your id will be verified. your device will be matched against the database. we work closely with law enforcement. when you insert your license what happens seele at the headquarters an image of the drivers license and make sure it is a good idea. the person compares to make sure it is valid. it is, we let the transaction go forward. >> ok. you have been cleared. >> they know me. -- yes. ok. we put the sticker on the track. we go to the next step. this opens up. put it in. are these in operation? >> we have a little over 400 right now in 25 states. now the machine is looking at the device and trying to determine what it is. >> it is looking through all the different phones? >> it is looking through almost every phone that we have trained it to. it gives you a range. we will say yes, it is the iphone. it has not done the full test yet. it knows what it is. now it has spun around to the right cable for the iphone five. >> can it tell that the screen is completely scratch? >
. so what we're focusing on is the impacts of the project. relative to the environment, both as it exists and in the cumulative condition. >> so i think this then to kind of my overall concern of how where we do environmental impact review, particularly for a neighborhood as dense as this is and expected to absorb even more population growth and density. so there the way that you have articulated that, kind of brings back miss brandt-hawley's analogy, which is that you can just have a glass of water and pour a little bit in at a time and it will never be considered significant because of the increment and it came up last summer with the at&t light box question and at what number do we hit and say it's significant; right? and clearly there was an answer to that. with each individual project we tend to do eirs for each individual development project and at what point do we say it's significant, where the project spills over? so i guess my broader question is at what point do we say that we are really impacting a neighborhood and not thinking about the mitigations for it? >>
they will come up to a solution to this problem? >> yeah, i think you>svve to think about this environment. it's going to be a really unique environment. how often do you get to go on plane and not having to watch a movie and eat peanuts. you'll get to interact with everybody else. >> this is a charter. you have 100 people on a 747. >> they've got to plane to themselves. >> plenty of leg space. >> plenty of wandering around. this is not a sitting down flight. this is getting around. >> will you have a few media people on board? >> sure. we would love for you to come with us. >> there's this culture, this idea of doing this. i was lucky enough to be invited one year. you can have brilliant people but it has to be the right interes interesting mix and then amaze things happen. >> we believe innovation happens when people come together. one of our advisory remembers says innovation is a contact sport. you have to get people together. that's what we do. we bring people together around the world. >> how else are you trying to innovate? forget this particular flight and what you're doing here but yo
practices and rechart our course to safely navigates the environment. we've taken particular notice of the youth advocates who have registered their support of officer safety as well their omission to rearming probation officers. i want to thank supervisor campos at the outset of his presentation and remarks making mention of the process the department has made in terms of evidence based practices and the focus of our work. >> but we do need to make a presentation that follows defense attorneys the requests that's made at the agenda that's old in the agenda that we're going to focus on the core peace officer responsibilities by holding the highest risk chronic reresidency offenders while released into the communities court jurisdiction. i'm happy to introduce my colleague to share a presentation. chief. >> thank you very much for the introduction. i have a fairly comprehensive power point prevention i'd like to make. good afternoon supervisors and a members of the public and those viewing at home. i'm the assistant chief officer of the department and i intended to share with you o
's a big risky feel we have to do given our current environment >> at this point we'll open to public comment. i have a number of them. i'll call them out. please feel free to come up (calling names) >> morning that you i'm mary dignity i'm the general manager for the clear channel. over the last several years i've had the joy of the working with the city. clear channel is excited to continue our supportive of local businesses. we continue to value them as partners. we continually use local carpenters and contractors. we are committed to the hiring of local folks. clear channel appreciates, respects and wholeheartedly likes our arrangement with the city. there's no way any vendor would every over a making of 10 million it is not a good business decision. if this was to go back and be required to be amassing percentage you're going to receive a lower making there's no way you would get $10 million. and it still is aggressive. i also want to commit on the dillal aspect that if you're removing 8 static locations to create a more pleasing environment to put one unit up i don't necessaril
that but there's a big risk for clear channel. it's a big risky feel we have to do given our current environment >> at this point we'll open to public comment. i have a number of them. i'll call them out. please feel free to come up (calling names) >> morning that you i'm mary dignity i'm the general manager for the clear channel. over the last several years i've had the joy of the working with the city. clear channel is excited to continue our supportive of local businesses. we continue to value them as partners. we continually use local carpenters and contractors. we are committed to the hiring of local folks. clear channel appreciates, respects and wholeheartedly likes our arrangement with the city. there's no way any vendor would every over a making of 10 million it is not a good business decision. if this was to go back and be required to be amassing percentage you're going to receive a lower making there's no way you would get $10 million. and it still is aggressive. i also want to commit on the dillal aspect that if you're removing 8 static locations to create a more pleasing environmen
rethink our traditional practices and rechart our course to safely navigates the environment. we've taken particular notice of the youth advocates who have registered their support of officer safety as well their omission to rearming probation officers. i want to thank supervisor campos at the outset of his presentation and remarks making mention of the process the department has made in terms of evidence based practices and the focus of our work. >> but we do need to make a presentation that follows defense attorneys the requests that's made at the agenda that's old in the agenda that we're going to focus on the core peace officer responsibilities by holding the highest risk chronic reresidency offenders while released into the communities court jurisdiction. i'm happy to introduce my colleague to share a presentation. chief. >> thank you very much for the introduction. i have a fairly comprehensive power point prevention i'd like to make. good afternoon supervisors and a members of the public and those viewing at home. i'm the assistant chief officer of the department and i intended t
, in the resource environment that we are in, getting the bilingual officer to the scene is time-consuming and elongates the whole process. not having access to a cell phone for an officer forces him into position to use whatever is available or the personal cell phone. that should not be the case. one thing we do, i want to mention as a program, as a policy that we would like to see,we would like to see language line gets training on domestic violence awareness and maybe cultural competency issues. they provide a huge service to the city. the city is one of their biggest clients. i think there is a lot to be said for the idea that language in and of itself is not a panacea; it is not monolithic. there is a difference between saying a restraining order and saying something else, and how you even talk to the victim of trauma is vital. we would like to see more involvement, rather than assuming that they are the experts which is i think how the police have looked at it in the past. language line is the expert on language, and they should teach us. we have a lot to
risk for clear channel. it's a big risky feel we have to do given our current environment >> at this point we'll open to public comment. i have a number of them. i'll call them out. please feel free to come up (calling names) >> morning that you i'm mary dignity i'm the general manager for the clear channel. over the last several years i've had the joy of the working with the city. clear channel is excited to continue our supportive of local businesses. we continue to value them as partners. we continually use local carpenters and contractors. we are commitd the hin of local folks. clear channel appreciates, respects and wholeheartedly likes our arrangement with the city. there's no way any vendor would every over a making of 10 million it is not a good business decision. if this was to go back and be required to be amassing percentage you're going to receive a lower making there's no way you would get $10 million. and it still is aggressive. i also want to commit on the dillal aspect that if you're removing 8 static locations to create a more pleasing environment to pu
. both chose the efficient bulb but if it was labeled with a sticker that said protect the environment those who identified themselves as politically moderate or conservative were less likely to buy that light bulb. >> stephen: of course they won't buy it now its a liberal light bulb. it will let you screw it in before you're married to it. but if we're all on teams now, to get conservatives to buy eco-products, you're going to have to say they're bad for the planet. we're not going to buy 7th generation recycled toilet paper but we'll line up in droves for first generation sequoia murder now with 20% more seal pup. and i may be a man, but i will buy a crate of tampons if the box features a crying barack obama. he's sad, he's sad because all the hormones in the water supply now make me menstruate. folks, this cutting off our nose to spite the other guy's face goes beyond light bulbs. a recent gallup poll on gun control found that 73% of republicans would vote to expand background checks but a second gallup poll found that 50% of republicans approved the senate not passing background ch
aspects. >> what better way to show that the puc cares about the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ everybody, welcome. we have a packed agenda tonight. first we want to thank the southeast community facility commission for opening their doors tonight and their executive director, moses. thank you for opening the doors tonight. we have a very, very tight agenda. th
we want to provide the forum, the environment where the women can work together over the course of a year to grow and understand and thrive and perhaps get a different insight to opportunities. we don't guarantee any contracts. we guarantee a lot of great information. >> any other? >> i want to add to that question. we did see an increase in the category called other business enterprises. we saw a major increase in certification of those businesses, and it's a good thing. i think -- about 1110 of the businesses and 310 of women owned business so it's kind of lopsided. >> the reason i brought it up is because i've gone through the position of trying to do business with the government as a small business. in fact i worked with beverly to get registered as a lb but 80% through my first contract and just in terms of feedback it's definitely without giving specific arguments to support the statement i am sure there are specific issues that will support getting women into the program that is unique to womens' opportunities and the ability to participate in the opportunities but
that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor
to pass comprehensive legislation, a couple of weeks ago, tony testified in front of the environment and public works committee on why we need to pass and get the safe cosmetics out there on the floor of that senate, he did a fantastic job and i stole this off the video which is archiving, you can watch it, and this act would call for quick action on the chemicals of greatest concern, would increase access to basic health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those h
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have poverty, a quarter of our children have no health care. what was a million students a year and a half ago is now a million and a half. when you have good nutrition and good health, you will learn better. it goes hand in hand with good mental health and a good school environment. the research points out, we want our k
of impact on the environment and that's really key. just in terms of overall impacts of the plan, you know, it's going to result in 39 significant unavoidable impacts on the environment and then about 42 total impacts would be less than significant or we are going to be able to mitigate them in the region. one of the things that is important to note about the significant and unavoidable impact might strike you, 39 significant unavoidable impacts, but actually great proportion of those are determined significant and unavoidable because mtc and abag have no ability to control local jurisdiction and positions the mitigation measures and project sponsors in different projects. for ceqa purposes and conservative analysis they say, well, we really can't control if local jurisdictions are going to implement these mitigation measures. and because of that we're going to say that plan results in significant and unavoidable impacts. so, with that just wanted to focus the discussion a little bit on the potential of c-e-q-a review implications of the draft e-i-r. so, one of the goals is to provide for
the cats that are in this pretty complex environment and trying to get them moving in a common direction. >> general baldwin? >> first, i'm very, very encouraged at the direction the department of defense has taken in changing the way that we do support the civil authorities. and the evolution, the problem that came out of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no visibility on what forces are available at camp pen
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